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Posts tagged public relations

Media Moves

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We love getting – and sharing — the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Catie Dixon, national editor at Bisnow, spoke about editorial strategy on the “New Media Species” panel at the National Association of Real Estate Editors spring conference. Dixon began as a reporter at Bisnow in 2009, and says the publication is not as “inside baseball” as it used to be. Now, reporters and editors are looking increasingly for real estate stories that are interesting and relevant to a broader audience. Dixon said retail and sports stadiums are interesting to everyone and having a U.S. president who is a real estate developer translates to lots of real estate story angles with broad appeal.

Catie Dixon (middle) talked about Bisnow's editorial strategy at NAREE in Denver, Colorado last week.

Catie Dixon (middle) talked about Bisnow’s editorial strategy at NAREE in Denver, Colorado last week.

Dixon also shed some light on Bisnow’s revenue model. The site’s content is 100 percent free (no paywall) and while Bisnow generates some revenue from advertising and sponsored content, the majority of their revenue comes from events.


 

National television news shows appear to be holding on to their viewership numbers, while political talk shows are actually growing, according to a new Network News Fact Sheet from Pew Research Center. The data reveals the combined average viewership for the ABC, CBS and NBC networks remained stable, decreasing only one percent in 2016. On a more interesting note, the combined average audience for Sunday’s political talk shows on the three networks grew by 14 percent in 2016, following an eight percent increase from 2014-2015.

Read more here:

The patterns and data about network TV news.

McClatchy’s is trying to refresh its newsrooms with a “digitial reinvention” strategy. McClatchy’s team is advising journalists to spend more time gathering stories that digitial audiences are looking for in local journalism. Tim Grieve, vice president of news for McClatchy, said readers come to a local site for local content, so generic celebrity fluff or cute videos are not an asset. Digital audiences are looking for a deep story with a strong personality element; these are the biggest audience engagement winners.

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McClatchy’s big move to digital journalism has proven successful so far. The first two newsrooms to complete the digital reinvention program saw their page views rise 26 percent and 58 percent, respectively.

The McClatchy Company is an American publishing company based in Sacramento, California. It operates 31 daily newspapers including (Raleigh) The News & Observer, The Miami Herald and The Sacramento Bee.

Read more here:

McClatchey’s plan to reinvent its newsrooms.

Screen Shot 2017-06-20 at 11.08.13 AMIf you love the TV show or blog “The Pioneer Woman,” you’re in luck! Just a few weeks after reducing the frequency of Dr. Oz The Good Life, Hearst Magazines wants you to know it still believes in celebrity-driven publications. The Pioneer Woman Magazine debuted on June 6 and is being sold in 4,000 Walmart stores across the country. A spokesperson from Hearst tells min that distribution beyond Walmart will be determined after the two-issue pilot run.

Read more here:

The Pioneer Woman Magazine is Ree Drummond’s latest project.

 

Media Moves: June 2017

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We love getting – and sharing the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 11.13.26 AMCNN celebrated its 37th anniversary on June 1. Go back in time with Jennifer Wood, senior editor of MentalFloss.com, as she recaps CNN’s first day on the air.
Read more here:

CNN celebrates 37th anniversary

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Washington D.C. bureau chief, Michael Scherer, sat down with min to discuss the details behind his one-of-a-kind story about President Donald Trump. Time magazine recently spent nearly three hours with the president in his private quarters. Scherer shares what it’s now like covering the president and D.C politics.

Read more here:

Behind the Story: Tim’s Intimate Dinner with the President

As news junkies, we love behind-the-scenes looks into news organizations and how they make decisions. We’ve noticed a number of newspapers in recent years, including our local Atlanta Journal-Constitution, offering readers more of this information. The New York Times published an article recently explaining and illustrating the front page before and after F.B.I Director, James B. Comey’s firing. Who knew the front page of The Times starts each day as a hand-drawn sketch on green paper?

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Read more here:

An F.B.I. Director Is Terminated, and a Front Page Is Too

Laura Kern, former executive editor of New York Magazine, is taking on the role of editor-in-chief of Apple News. The popular Apple app does not currently have original content as it pulls top stories from participating media brands. Will Kern turn Apple News into that of a distributive content creator?Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 9.46.41 AM

Read more here:

Apple News Poaches New York Magazine Executive Editor

 

 

 

Making News: Our Clients in the Headlines 5/23/17

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photos.medleyphoto.14115631  1. During the height of rush hour on March 30, thick black smoke swelled above Atlanta. First responders sprung to action to tame the massive fire roaring beneath I-85 in Atlanta. According to North American Properties’ Mark Toro, “This breathtaking moment was a shock to our system – a shock our city sorely needed.” In this Atlanta Journal Constitution op-ed, Toro challenges all Atlantans to use the I-85 collapse as a lesson for why we need to commit to expand MARTA and make it a part of our daily commute.

2. Change is afoot in the commercial insurance industry. The forward-looking technology landscape and the growing regulatory environment are reshaping the vital ways in which the industry engages with customers, especially in the U.S. Laura Calugar recently interviewed Franklin Street’s Ted Holler in Commercial Property Executive to discuss how his company had adapted to recent changes.

3. For investors in Amazon, the most important number to remember is 20. When online MW-FM357_amazon_20170511175400_MGsales hit 20 percent of all purchases in a given retail category, a surge in Amazon growth is sure to follow. But not all retailers are falling prey to Amazon’s business model. In this MarketWatch article, Revenue Analytics’ Jared Wiesel said, “Most pockets of retail success today have some sort of protective moat around their business that helps them fend off Amazon.”

4. Recent headlines about Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly have undoubtedly increased awareness regarding sexual harassment in the workplace. With the heightened interest amongst employees regarding workplace rights, Fisher Phillips’ Michelli Rivera says, “Metro Atlanta employers should brace themselves for more sexual harassment-related inquiries.” In this op-ed for the Atlanta Journal Constitution, Rivera offers proactive steps that can better protect Atlanta businesses – and hopefully keep them out of the headlines.

5. On the heels of back-to-back grand openings of two major mixed-use developments, the Bayer Properties team arrived at ICSC’s RECon conference in Las Vegas with a fresh viewpoint on how retail is changing and what today’s consumers are seeking. In this Shopping Centers Today article, CEO and president Jeffrey Bayer said, “We are excited to be here this year surrounded by retail experts to learn from each other and discuss the future of the ever-evolving industry.”

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Media Moves: May 2017

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We love getting – and sharing ­ the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally

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11Alive hired a new morning host. Cheryl Preheim, a former broadcast host at the NBC affiliate in Denver, Colorado, said she plans to embrace Atlanta and tell stories that connect with people.

Read more about her story here:

New 11Alive morning host embraces Atlanta

As video continues to evolve media companies hurry to adapt. See how companies like Time Inc. and Condé Nast are rethinking their format and distribution strategies to include video.

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As video evolves media companies try to adapt

The New York Times just named former Buisnessweek editor in chief, Ellen Pollack, to top editor of its business section.

Read more about this story:

Ellen Pollack named editor of The New York Times business section

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-26 at 11.58.01 AMAfter 15 years publishing print editions, Mental Floss magazine decided to go completely digital in 2017. Despite what you may think, the brand argues that shedding its print product opened many new doors.

Read more about this story:

Life after print for Mental Floss

After 40 years of making readers laugh, The New Yorker’s beloved cartoon artist, Bob Mankoff, retired at the end of last month.

Read more about his story:

Bob Mankoff will step down as The New Yorker magazine’s cartoon editor


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April Digital Updates

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We’re all about keeping up with the digital world at The Wilbert Group and leveraging the newest technologies to help our clients tell their stories. Here’s the latest:

#1 Instagram takes on yet another rival network: Pinterest.

Instagram is already encroaching on Snapchat’s territory with its popular Stories feature – which succeeded in stealing Snapchat users – so it makes sense that the photo-sharing giant is now going after Pinterest with its latest update. To the joy of its users, Instagram introduced the ability to save posts earlier this year. Now, you can sort those posts into “collections” that are eerily reminiscent of Pinterest’s boards. This update makes it more important than ever for content creators to create truly valuable, save-worthy content to allow it to live a second life for a user, whether it’s a recipe, design inspiration or a secret menu dish at a restaurant. As Engadget sums up the opportunity for businesses: “If you can create your ideal outfit by saving posts into collections, you might be more likely to buy that outfit.”

#2 LinkedIn continues to undergo a complete makeover.

LinkedIn’s facelift is in full swing. While there isn’t one noteworthy update to include here on the blog, I wanted to touch on this because, as social media managers, we’re constantly learning and relearning how to keep our client’s content fresh as LinkedIn shifts seemingly every day. Important changes for content creators include: The ability to use video, new photo sizes and filters and a new algorithm for the feed. LinkedIn also plans to revisit its publishing tools, including the ability to save articles for later and improved tagging, ultimately making the blog posts look much cleaner and full of dynamic content like photos, block quotes and graphics.

#3 Snapchat is reaching an increasingly older demographic.

Snapchat isn’t just for millennials anymore. The app – which recently made its IPO – is experiencing increased usage in those ages 25 to 44, far from its typical younger audience. Forty-one percent of users ages 25 to 34 used the app more often today than during Jefferies’ first survey last June. Forty-four percent of the 34 to 44 demographic use Snapchat more now, the firm said.

It’s not atypical for older users to follow typically young early adopters to new platforms – just look at Facebook and Twitter. However, that migration sometimes drives the younger users away because the platform isn’t cool anymore, or because grandma and grandpa are now able to view their content. This shift may be a ways off for Snapchat, but something the app should consider moving forward. Hopefully, they can continue to provide content – from news stories to fun face-altering filters – to keep their original base happy while expanding to new audiences.

PR Lessons I Learned from ‘Shark Tank’

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14175093191_9c5cffdf72_bHi, my name is Savannah, and I’m addicted to Shark Tank. I watch old episodes, new episodes and Beyond the Tank. At least one TV in our house is turned to CNBC to catch reruns at all times. I buy products and eat at restaurants (and food trucks) solely based on their involvement with Shark Tank. In short, I am an addict.

While Shark Tank helps force me to think creatively — and always makes me wonder what my million-dollar idea will be — I started to realize over time that many of the show’s lessons are actually applicable to public relations. Below are my top four takeaways.

  1. A good, solid pitch is a must. Having a pitch that’s dynamic and gets to the point quickly is key in capturing the Sharks’ attention, the same way a pitch must quickly garner the interest of a journalist. It has to be just the right length while effectively conveying your message. If it’s too long or not getting to the point, you’ll lose interest. 
  1. Know your clients – their audience, competition and industry. The entrepreneurs on Shark Tank must know their business from top to bottom. Similarly, PR pros must know the ins and outs of their client’s business as if it were their own. If you don’t know your client’s target audiences, how can you create a plan to reach them effectively? If you don’t know their competition, how will you be able to differentiate them? If you don’t know their industry, how will you effectively tell their story? All of this is paramount to PR success.
  1. Confidence is key. Anyone who watches regularly knows that the entrepreneurs who enter the tank with confidence are already more likely to get a deal. Like Shark Tank, confidence can make or break you. Clients are looking to you for your expertise in PR, and if you’re unsure of yourself it shows. A PR pro that’s always second-guessing themselves and their decisions can make a client nervous, and ultimately cause them to seek other PR help. 
  1. Hire people smarter than you. It’s completely OK to admit that something isn’t your area of expertise and hire someone who knows more about something than you do. Entrepreneurs are always seeking out partnerships with Sharks who can help them with a part of business they are struggling with, whether it’s manufacturing or marketing. As the PR landscape continues to evolve, companies are going to rely on and hire experts, like social media managers, for example, who can help a company continue to expand its offerings and grow.

Twitter’s New Moments Page Represents a Bigger Change in Newsgathering Habits

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If you graduated with a mass communications degree, you probably remember a class in theories. One theory that sticks out is the gatekeeping theory – the idea that journalists are gatekeepers of the news. They decide what is newsworthy and what is not. Journalists make these decisions carefully and with journalistic integrity. They have a responsibility to uphold to keep the public’s trust and deliver the news accurately, fairly and without bias. It’s a job the media takes very seriously.

 

These media decisions impact public knowledge – we the people don’t decide what’s front page, what’s on the 6 p.m. news, etc. But, with the explosive growth of social media, that model is changing. More and more are getting the news from social media where there are options to customize news interests and define the types of stories we want to read about. And with Twitter’s new Moments page, that paradigm shift is clearer than ever.

Twitter Moments

Twitter Moments

Let’s start with what the new Twitter Moments page is.

 

Twitter Moments are meant to represent the latest conversations happening around an issue regardless of who you follow. The new Moments page resembles a mobile news site with a selection of stories and topics. Slate gives a good example of how it works:

 

“For instance, if you follow a story about the South Carolina floods, Twitter will automatically drop new tweets from that story into your timeline as it develops. Once the story is over, you won’t have to unfollow it—you’ll just stop seeing those tweets.”

 

The main difference between your regular Twitter feed and Twitter Moments is the Moments are editorially driven. You can read more about Moments from Twitter here.

 

Who creates these Moments?

 

As of now, only identified Moment creators can add to the feed. Launch partners include the New York Times, Buzzfeed, Entertainment Weekly, Fox News, NASA, The Washington Post and Vogue. Twitter says it wants to work with a wide variety of publishers to contribute to the Moments page. Yes, these creators are the new digital gatekeepers and they are accountable to the same journalistic standards as traditional media.

 

The cool thing is the end-user (you, me, etc.) has control over what is newsworthy on an individual level. Do you want to read about world news? U.S. news? Politics? Sports? Entertainment? Or perhaps all of the above. We can follow a variety of stories from different beats without having to flip TV channels or thumb through newspapers.

 

What does this mean for traditional media?

 

Social media is taking the news seriously. Twitter has invested big-time in an editorially driven section. And they aren’t the first. Think about SnapChat and its Discover feature. Our newsgathering habits are changing to be more interactive and personalized, and the news will continue to be shared across a multitude of both traditional and untraditional platforms.

 

What does this mean for our clients?

 

Social media is a serious communication tool that will continue to build its presence in the market. As part of your organization’s communication strategy, it’s important to consider a multifaceted approach that includes social media.

 

To see Twitter Moments live, visit https://twitter.com/i/moments.

 

Making News: Our Clients in the Headlines Part 1

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by Alyssa Wenger

As always, The Wilbert Group team worked hard this week to land our clients in the news. Here is a sampling of the coverage they received:

#1. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution covered Aaron’s National Manager’s Meeting in New Orleans and the company’s efforts to refurbish the city.

#2. Charlotte-based client Crescent Communities was featured in The Charlotte Observer in a story about its expansion into more urban developments.

#3. American Banker published a story about Equifax’s partnership with Zoot to launch a new app increasing the number of accounts opened on mobile devices.

American Banker article

 

#4. An exciting event at Atlantic Station, the 6th annual Beer Carnival, was highlighted in a photo gallery from WSB-TV’s website.

#5. In a recent article speaking to the increased use of predictive analyticsby cruise lines, Cruise Industry News featured a subject matter expert from Revenue Analytics.

But wait – there’s more to come! We have been so busy this week that we need more than just one post to share all our client coverage… check back tomorrow for even more hits we have landed!

Making News: Our Clients in the Headlines

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by Alyssa Wenger

Curious about hits The Wilbert Group has secured for clients lately? Check out recent coverage:

#1. For its story on issues facing the University of Oklahoma after a recent racist act by students, The Wall Street Journal quoted expert source Scott Schneider, a partner at Fisher & Phillips

#2. Trey Loughran of Equifax was quoted in a USA Today article about how credit card offers are signaling a stronger economy.

#3. Two chefs from Camana Bay on Grand Cayman, Michael Schwartz and Thomas Tennant, were referenced in Smarter Travel’s article on the hottest food trends of 2015.

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#4. We placed a story for Fisher & Phillips in the Atlanta Business Chronicle on the risks of in-office March Madness betting.

#5. Alpharetta/Roswell Revue & News wrote a story on Avalon’s “Perfect Year” program.

Award Winning Clients

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by Adina Kalish

Clients at The Wilbert Group don’t just get treated to a white-glove public relations experience that gets them featured in the press, they win awards! Our team of professionals is highly skilled at researching the right industry awards that highlight the extraordinary work being done in all areas of our clients’ businesses. Whether it’s securing a spot on a featured panel, crafting an engaging story of a new opening, details of a successful business transaction, or operations behind a special event, The Wilbert Group finds the perfect award to fit the project.

For the past several years, The Wilbert Group has worked on submissions for our client, North American Properties (NAP) on the prestigious MAXI Awards, presented each year at the International Council of Shopping Centers’ (ICSC) meeting. And we’re pleased to say that in 2014 NAP was the recipient of four MAXIs.

How? By being strategic. Want to do the same? Follow our top five tips for writing award entries that win!

1. Start with the story. Every award entry must captivate a reader from the first sentence. Set the scene. Create the visuals. Grab the reader and assume he/she knows nothing!

2. Set up the situation. Be clear with why you’re submitting an entry for this category by succinctly stating the scenario, the challenge or the goal of the intended award.

3. Be specific. When getting to the meat of your submission, make sure you detail exactly how you achieved your results step by step and which key players were involved.

4. Get accurate figures to support your results. Back up your entry with precise figures. Whether it’s numbers of people at an event, dollar amounts spent on a campaign, or statistics that support your story, numbers are impressive.

5. Celebrate the PR hits. Did the word get out to the right influencers? Print? TV? Bloggers? Make sure you keep track of all the fantastic press you got for your client so you can highlight this in the entry.