The Wilbert Group Blog

Posts tagged news

Media Moves: July 2017

Share

We love getting – and sharing the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Jewel Wicker, digital arts and entertainment reporter for the Atlanta Screen Shot 2017-07-13 at 1.41.09 PMJournal Constitution, has left the paper and started her journey as a freelancer specializing in entertainment. Jewel created a variety of content for the AJC including event roundups, concert reviews, TV recaps and more.

With all the changes magazines face, the one consistent trend is the decline of print advertising. Moody’s estimates that print ads will continue to fall 10 percent through mid-2018.

Min spoke with various publications about their new revenue strategies.

Read more about it here:

Closing the Gap: How Magazine Media is Solving for Print Losses

“Change is like oxygen: We need it to exist. It’s part of the daily rhythm of life. Instead of running away from it, try to embrace it,” Ron Smith, managing editor for news at USA Today, told Poynter in a Q&A about challenges he faces in his news organization as well as advice he has for others.

Screen Shot 2017-07-13 at 4.46.08 PM

Read more about it here:

USA Today managing editor for news talks challenges, advice and guidance

Did you know nearly two-thirds of adults in the United States who use Twitter get their news from the social media platform? Pew Research Center takes an in-depth look at how adults are using Twitter for news, not only whether they tweet about news and follow news organizations, but also what news topics they tweet about, and how many news media accounts they follow.

Read more about the findings here:

How do Americans use Twitter for news?

Media Moves: June 2017

Share

 

We love getting – and sharing the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 11.13.26 AMCNN celebrated its 37th anniversary on June 1. Go back in time with Jennifer Wood, senior editor of MentalFloss.com, as she recaps CNN’s first day on the air.
Read more here:

CNN celebrates 37th anniversary

Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 11.22.03 AM

Washington D.C. bureau chief, Michael Scherer, sat down with min to discuss the details behind his one-of-a-kind story about President Donald Trump. Time magazine recently spent nearly three hours with the president in his private quarters. Scherer shares what it’s now like covering the president and D.C politics.

Read more here:

Behind the Story: Tim’s Intimate Dinner with the President

As news junkies, we love behind-the-scenes looks into news organizations and how they make decisions. We’ve noticed a number of newspapers in recent years, including our local Atlanta Journal-Constitution, offering readers more of this information. The New York Times published an article recently explaining and illustrating the front page before and after F.B.I Director, James B. Comey’s firing. Who knew the front page of The Times starts each day as a hand-drawn sketch on green paper?

Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 3.49.53 PM

Read more here:

An F.B.I. Director Is Terminated, and a Front Page Is Too

Laura Kern, former executive editor of New York Magazine, is taking on the role of editor-in-chief of Apple News. The popular Apple app does not currently have original content as it pulls top stories from participating media brands. Will Kern turn Apple News into that of a distributive content creator?Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 9.46.41 AM

Read more here:

Apple News Poaches New York Magazine Executive Editor

 

 

 

Making News: Our Clients in the Headlines 5/23/17

Share

photos.medleyphoto.14115631  1. During the height of rush hour on March 30, thick black smoke swelled above Atlanta. First responders sprung to action to tame the massive fire roaring beneath I-85 in Atlanta. According to North American Properties’ Mark Toro, “This breathtaking moment was a shock to our system – a shock our city sorely needed.” In this Atlanta Journal Constitution op-ed, Toro challenges all Atlantans to use the I-85 collapse as a lesson for why we need to commit to expand MARTA and make it a part of our daily commute.

2. Change is afoot in the commercial insurance industry. The forward-looking technology landscape and the growing regulatory environment are reshaping the vital ways in which the industry engages with customers, especially in the U.S. Laura Calugar recently interviewed Franklin Street’s Ted Holler in Commercial Property Executive to discuss how his company had adapted to recent changes.

3. For investors in Amazon, the most important number to remember is 20. When online MW-FM357_amazon_20170511175400_MGsales hit 20 percent of all purchases in a given retail category, a surge in Amazon growth is sure to follow. But not all retailers are falling prey to Amazon’s business model. In this MarketWatch article, Revenue Analytics’ Jared Wiesel said, “Most pockets of retail success today have some sort of protective moat around their business that helps them fend off Amazon.”

4. Recent headlines about Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly have undoubtedly increased awareness regarding sexual harassment in the workplace. With the heightened interest amongst employees regarding workplace rights, Fisher Phillips’ Michelli Rivera says, “Metro Atlanta employers should brace themselves for more sexual harassment-related inquiries.” In this op-ed for the Atlanta Journal Constitution, Rivera offers proactive steps that can better protect Atlanta businesses – and hopefully keep them out of the headlines.

5. On the heels of back-to-back grand openings of two major mixed-use developments, the Bayer Properties team arrived at ICSC’s RECon conference in Las Vegas with a fresh viewpoint on how retail is changing and what today’s consumers are seeking. In this Shopping Centers Today article, CEO and president Jeffrey Bayer said, “We are excited to be here this year surrounded by retail experts to learn from each other and discuss the future of the ever-evolving industry.”

draper

New Report Shows Americans are Increasingly Getting News from Facebook and Twitter

Share

I first found out about yesterday’s attacks in my hometown of Chattanooga, Tennessee, on Twitter. And I clicked on stories from multiple news organizations in my feed to get additional information. I searched #Chattanooga.

 

Americans are increasingly getting their news on Twitter and Facebook, according to a new report released this week from Pew Research. Sixty-three percent of Twitter users go to the platform for news, while only 52 percent said they were doing so in 2013. On Facebook, 63 percent of users now go to the platform for news, up from 47 percent in 2013.

 

As a public relations professional, I have to ask what this shift in the media landscape means for my clients. I think it fundamentally means two things:

  • Companies can and should be their own media companies. If organizations are putting out content that is useful and engaging, people will read it. We just launched a new blog and Twitter feed for our client, Marlin, and I think/hope it will become a meaningful resource for small business owners across the United States.
  • Traditional media still has inherent credibility, but people may be reading a story from The New York Times in a Twitter feed instead of in the actual paper. When we secure good hits for our clients in traditional media, we strategically amplify those hits on social and digital channels. We launched a program this year called Wilbert Amplify focused on pushing traditional hits onto social channels; after all that’s where Americans now get their news.

Five Grapes from the PR Vine

Share

by Leigh Taylor

Following the trend of “short visual bites,” Twitter has released Vine, an app for iPhones that creates six-second videos. NBC News, CNN en Español, The Daily Beast and others are already using the app to give tours of their facilities and capture moments in news.

Vine is sure to take off in the world of PR as well. Just as Twitter introduced the 140-word press release, Vine allows us to share condensed video news releases.

Leigh uses her phone to shoot a Vine video in the Wilbert office.

In an age where video seems to be overtaking written word, Vine combines aspects of YouTube and Instagram for a visual-hungry generation, of which I am certainly part.

Here are five aspects of the app that PR professionals should know:

#1 Vine is Facebook and Twitter ready. Every video you make is set and ready to be shared on social media. Share quick bites from a groundbreaking or speech in real time.

#2 It doesn’t automatically import Twitter followers and connections, which is a pain for clients who already have built a strong following. To add Vine users, you must do so manually.

#3 GIFs, moving images on a loop, have become extremely popular online, Vine allows every user to create GIF-like segments right on their phones, keeping PR professionals hip and current.

#4 Vine posts auto-play as you scroll through the feed, which allows for quick, easy viewing.

#5 Vine will help keep audiences interested. Because of the app’s six-second time limit, Vine offers a great way to tease major announcements. It connects with an audience with an attention span that, in today’s culture, is growing shorter by the day.

Check out this quick look inside a day at The Wilbert Group!

This Year’s Media Game Changers

Share

by M.C. Rhodes

It’s no secret technology has been a game changer for the media industry. With constant innovation moving us forward, the industry has had to reevaluate what constitutes news as well as the best way to get it to people. We’re taking a look at five important events in media from 2012 that demonstrate just how fundamentally and quickly the media landscape is shifting.

#1 Instagram Use Soars During Hurricane Sandy The massive “Frankenstorm” that pounded the east coast during October impacted the country’s biggest media hub—New York City—and underscored the importance of citizen journalism.

Those deep in the storm’s path reported exactly what was happening where they lived, without the help of fancy news cameras and professional reporters. Everyday people used Instagram, a photo-sharing service created in 2010, to spread pictures of the destruction.

Hurricane Sandy was called the biggest event in Instagram history, with 10 pictures per second posted with the hashtag #sandy during the storm.

#2 Social Media Changes Election Coverage The 2012 presidential election was a breakthrough in terms of how news outlets use social media to report news.

Twitter was barely a presence in the 2008 presidential election, yet played a huge role in this year’s election. Some of Twitter’s biggest nights in its history were around the televised debates.

The gap between what the media thought people are talking about and what they were actually talking about narrowed. Social media let journalists see exactly what topics, what quotes and what gaffes people found most interesting, driving (for better or worse) professional coverage of the election.

#3 Newsweek Goes Digital Only More publications are pulling their print editions and going only digital. But it was still a shock when Newsweek, in print for almost 80 years and one of the most popular news magazines in the world, announced it would be moving to a completely digital format.

As advertisers look beyond print to place their ads, we may see more publications following suit.

#4 Murdoch’s The Daily Fails The explosion in tablet use in recent years has driven most publications to at least consider a mobile presence. Rupert Murdoch took that idea to a new level, launching The Daily, the world’s first newspaper offered exclusively on the iPad.

The Daily was launched as an alternative to traditional journalism to lead us in the digital age, with some of the country’s top journalists on staff. The $40-per-year app was graphic-oriented and interactive in nature.

However, The Daily went under in 2012. The cheap subscription price could not support a staff of 120 producing all original content, because not enough people were willing to pay even $40.

In order to make money behind a paywall, publications must create exciting content that cannot be found elsewhere. It wasn’t enough for The Daily to use the hottest technology; it needed to have the hottest product as well.

#5 Twitter Needs Spoiler Alert for Olympics One of the frustrating parts of watching the 2012 Summer Olympics for many in the western hemisphere was that viewers knew outcomes before they saw the event. NBC chose to air many events in primetime in the United States, but in a world where information travels so quickly, the medal winners weren’t much of a surprise hours later.

Because of this, NBC’s live-streaming service was immensely popular, both online and through mobile apps. NBC’s Olympic app had 7.1 million downloads, the most downloads for any single television event. Twitter lit up during the opening ceremony, the most-watched Summer Olympics opening ceremony in history. Again the media industry saw the importance of social media and the Internet in modern-day coverage.