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Media Moves

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We love getting – and sharing — the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Catie Dixon, national editor at Bisnow, spoke about editorial strategy on the “New Media Species” panel at the National Association of Real Estate Editors spring conference. Dixon began as a reporter at Bisnow in 2009, and says the publication is not as “inside baseball” as it used to be. Now, reporters and editors are looking increasingly for real estate stories that are interesting and relevant to a broader audience. Dixon said retail and sports stadiums are interesting to everyone and having a U.S. president who is a real estate developer translates to lots of real estate story angles with broad appeal.

Catie Dixon (middle) talked about Bisnow's editorial strategy at NAREE in Denver, Colorado last week.

Catie Dixon (middle) talked about Bisnow’s editorial strategy at NAREE in Denver, Colorado last week.

Dixon also shed some light on Bisnow’s revenue model. The site’s content is 100 percent free (no paywall) and while Bisnow generates some revenue from advertising and sponsored content, the majority of their revenue comes from events.


 

National television news shows appear to be holding on to their viewership numbers, while political talk shows are actually growing, according to a new Network News Fact Sheet from Pew Research Center. The data reveals the combined average viewership for the ABC, CBS and NBC networks remained stable, decreasing only one percent in 2016. On a more interesting note, the combined average audience for Sunday’s political talk shows on the three networks grew by 14 percent in 2016, following an eight percent increase from 2014-2015.

Read more here:

The patterns and data about network TV news.

McClatchy’s is trying to refresh its newsrooms with a “digitial reinvention” strategy. McClatchy’s team is advising journalists to spend more time gathering stories that digitial audiences are looking for in local journalism. Tim Grieve, vice president of news for McClatchy, said readers come to a local site for local content, so generic celebrity fluff or cute videos are not an asset. Digital audiences are looking for a deep story with a strong personality element; these are the biggest audience engagement winners.

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McClatchy’s big move to digital journalism has proven successful so far. The first two newsrooms to complete the digital reinvention program saw their page views rise 26 percent and 58 percent, respectively.

The McClatchy Company is an American publishing company based in Sacramento, California. It operates 31 daily newspapers including (Raleigh) The News & Observer, The Miami Herald and The Sacramento Bee.

Read more here:

McClatchey’s plan to reinvent its newsrooms.

Screen Shot 2017-06-20 at 11.08.13 AMIf you love the TV show or blog “The Pioneer Woman,” you’re in luck! Just a few weeks after reducing the frequency of Dr. Oz The Good Life, Hearst Magazines wants you to know it still believes in celebrity-driven publications. The Pioneer Woman Magazine debuted on June 6 and is being sold in 4,000 Walmart stores across the country. A spokesperson from Hearst tells min that distribution beyond Walmart will be determined after the two-issue pilot run.

Read more here:

The Pioneer Woman Magazine is Ree Drummond’s latest project.

 

Media Moves: June 2017

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We love getting – and sharing the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 11.13.26 AMCNN celebrated its 37th anniversary on June 1. Go back in time with Jennifer Wood, senior editor of MentalFloss.com, as she recaps CNN’s first day on the air.
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CNN celebrates 37th anniversary

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Washington D.C. bureau chief, Michael Scherer, sat down with min to discuss the details behind his one-of-a-kind story about President Donald Trump. Time magazine recently spent nearly three hours with the president in his private quarters. Scherer shares what it’s now like covering the president and D.C politics.

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Behind the Story: Tim’s Intimate Dinner with the President

As news junkies, we love behind-the-scenes looks into news organizations and how they make decisions. We’ve noticed a number of newspapers in recent years, including our local Atlanta Journal-Constitution, offering readers more of this information. The New York Times published an article recently explaining and illustrating the front page before and after F.B.I Director, James B. Comey’s firing. Who knew the front page of The Times starts each day as a hand-drawn sketch on green paper?

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Read more here:

An F.B.I. Director Is Terminated, and a Front Page Is Too

Laura Kern, former executive editor of New York Magazine, is taking on the role of editor-in-chief of Apple News. The popular Apple app does not currently have original content as it pulls top stories from participating media brands. Will Kern turn Apple News into that of a distributive content creator?Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 9.46.41 AM

Read more here:

Apple News Poaches New York Magazine Executive Editor

 

 

 

Media Moves: May 2017

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We love getting – and sharing ­ the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally

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11Alive hired a new morning host. Cheryl Preheim, a former broadcast host at the NBC affiliate in Denver, Colorado, said she plans to embrace Atlanta and tell stories that connect with people.

Read more about her story here:

New 11Alive morning host embraces Atlanta

As video continues to evolve media companies hurry to adapt. See how companies like Time Inc. and Condé Nast are rethinking their format and distribution strategies to include video.

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As video evolves media companies try to adapt

The New York Times just named former Buisnessweek editor in chief, Ellen Pollack, to top editor of its business section.

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Ellen Pollack named editor of The New York Times business section

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-26 at 11.58.01 AMAfter 15 years publishing print editions, Mental Floss magazine decided to go completely digital in 2017. Despite what you may think, the brand argues that shedding its print product opened many new doors.

Read more about this story:

Life after print for Mental Floss

After 40 years of making readers laugh, The New Yorker’s beloved cartoon artist, Bob Mankoff, retired at the end of last month.

Read more about his story:

Bob Mankoff will step down as The New Yorker magazine’s cartoon editor


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Media Moves: April 2017

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We love getting – and sharing —  the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Mitchell Northam is the new hyperlocal digital reporter for North Fulton at the Atlanta Journal Constitution. Northam is a native of Maryland and graduated from Salisbury University in 2015. Northam worked for the Delmarva Times as a breaking news reporter and covered sports in the area. He has written for USA Today and SB Nation. He recently wrote an article about #WilbertClient North American Properties’ Avalon expansion.

Read about it:

Details of Avalon’s Expansion: Apple store, four-star hotel among what’s coming 

Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 1.42.52 PMThe Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s yearlong investigative series, Doctors and Sex Abuse, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. The awards were announced Monday.

Read about it:

AJC Doctors is a series finalists for the Pulitzer Prize

Clifton Leaf, the new editor-in-chief at Fortune, announced the magazine has grown in two places this year. The first, video, makes sense, but the other, print, is more of a surprise. Leaf, formerly deputy editor at the magazine, shared his vision recently with min.

Read about it:

Good Fortune in Fortune’s future

The Amazon Echo has surprised everyone with its broad acceptance, and the large number of news organizations already participating on the platform. What will voice-enabled internet mean for journalism? Between Amazon Echo, Google Home and Siri it’s no surprise journalism is making the move to these digital platforms. Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 1.43.43 PM

Read about it:

Voice Enabled Internet and Journalism

Magazines are learning a new language

 

 

Media Moves: Let’s Tech About It

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We love getting – and sharing —  the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

With virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and the Amazon Echo, technology is advancing so rapidly these days it seems like flying time-traveling DeLorean’s soon might be a real possibility. 2016 was the first billion-dollar year for VR and it makes us wonder, how will the media use these new advances in technology to their benefit?

Virtual reality is expected to have more of an impact than TV and 3D ever did. It can be incorporated with your smartphone and has the power to transport you to another place.  It’s more natural because you’re literally in the middle of the experience.media-virtual-reality

Sanjay Macwan, chief technology officer of the NBCUniversal media labs, believes VR offers an “I felt like I was there” experience, and media will be able to use that to their advantage.

“At the basic level, virtual reality is a new thing and you always want to give something new to your consumers,” Macwan said. “This will provide a more intimate experience for the consumer in relation to the media’s content.”

Media companies believe in creating a media ecosystem – a community that exists across multiple channels from websites to social media and beyond. By including VR in their platforms, media outlets can tell stories like never before by literally inserting the consumer into the story.

When a new form of technology can revolutionize the way we communicate with the media, we should explore it. For centuries, the media has been technology-driven, moving from handwritten to hot and cold type printed media to digital and now virtual. VR is the next step in media storytelling. With it, the media will be able to guide readers through the story with interactive imagery aligned with the written word.

We look forward to embracing this new way of storytelling, do you?

Media Moves: Trump vs. the Media

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We love getting – and sharing —  the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

President Donald Trump’s battle with the media is unprecedented. News junkies wonder how this tension will change the media landscape, a landscape that already has been fundamentally altered in recent years due to technological and cultural shifts.

Here’s what some journalists have to say on the topic:

 

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Steve Adler, Editor-in-Chief at Reuters:

“It’s hardly surprising that the air is thick with questions and theories about how to cover the new Administration…So what is the Reuters answer?…We already know what to do because we do it every day, and we do it all over the world…I am perpetually proud of our work in places such as Turkey, the Philippines, Egypt, Iraq, Yemen, Thailand, China, Zimbabwe, and Russia, nations in which we sometimes encounter some combinat

ion of censorship, legal prosecution, visa denials, and even physical threats to our journalists. We respond to all of these by doing our best to protect our journalists, by recommitting ourselves to reporting fairly and honestly, by doggedly gathering hard-to-get information – and by remaining impartial. We write very rarely about ourselves and our troubles and very often about the issues that will make a difference in the businesses and lives of our readers and viewers.”

Read the full article.

Michael Wolff, columnist at USA Today:

“At the Wall Street Journal, there has been a debate about how to characterize, what many regard as, Trump’s disregard for the truth. Should his misstatements be labeled as outright lies? The Journal’s editor, Gerry Baker, argued, no, the facts should be clear, but a motive, to purposefully mislead, should not be assumed…The issue may not be Trump at all, but, the startling socio-political divide he’s revealed. It’s two nations opposed to each other, with the media almost entirely on one side of the divide. It’s not so much Trump that the media doesn’t know how to cover, but a social movement that sees the media as one of its significant enemies. In this, Trump’s behavior, his constant tweets, his tit for tats, his free associations, his high baloney quotient are all designed to disrupt the media foe, and, among other things, give it a nervous breakdown. In other words, the media is taking the Trump bait.”

Read the full article.

 Margaret Sullivan, media columnist at The Washington Post:

“One thing is certain in the presumptive era of President Trump. Journalists are going to have to be better — stronger, more courageous, stiffer-spined — than they’ve ever been…What we can’t do is buckle. What we can’t do is slink off and hope someone else will take

care of it. We have to keep doing our jobs of truth-telling, challenging power and holding those in power accountable — as the best journalists did during the campaign itself. We have to be willing to fight back.”

Read the full article.

Matthew Ingram, senior writer at Fortune:

“A weakened and increasingly marginalized traditional media, fighting with the tools of a previous era, surrounded by more nimble adversaries who know how to use social platforms for their own ends, and a president who is actively hostile to the traditional press. Not that long ago, it probably felt like things couldn’t get any worse for the media—but they just did.”

Read the full article.

Making News: Our Clients in the Headlines 7/7/16

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  1. Wilbertblogphoto(1)How did you celebrate Independence Day? In Atlanta, CRE pros displayed their patriotism by participating in the city’s many events, as reported in this Bisnow article by Jarred Schenke. Wilbert client North American Properties’ Liz Gillespie donned red, white and blue during the firm’s first annual 4th on the Square event at Colony Square in Midtown. The event took place Monday with music, food and a place for spectators to watch the Peachtree Road Race participants.
  1. In the June issue of Real Estate Forum, the magazine profiled “CRE’s Best Bosses.” Coming in at number one is Andrew Wright, Franklin Street CEO and Wilbert client. Wright won based on a poll by Real Estate Forum’s readers, totaling nearly 4,000 votes. The young CEO was 26 when he established the company in 2006. Since then, he has grown the full-service CRE firm from four people to 200 staffers in six offices in major markets throughout the Southeast, all focused on delivering value-added solutions to CRE owners and occupiers nationwide.
  1. WIlbertblogphoto(2)Mickey Mouse toothbrushes. Minnie Mouse watches. Toys, t-shirts and trinkets. Is there a brand or product that simply shouldn’t be Disneyfied? Incredibly, the answer might be no. Disney recently joined with clothing and accessories brand Coach on a collection that includes a $250 wristlet with oversize Mickey Mouse ears, a $1,995 leather motorcycle jacket with a studded Mickey Mouse silhouette on the back, and $245 Mickey Mouse sneakers. Wilbert client Revenue Analytics’ Jared Wiesel detailed his opinion of the matter in this MarketWatch article, saying, “If executed correctly, this unique offering should be relatively insulated from direct competitive threats and create a reason for new and existing customers to engage with the Coach brand.”
  1. Last month, Breakthrough Atlanta, in partnership with the Atlanta chapter of the National Basketball Retired Players Association and Wilbert client Aaron’s, hosted its second Celebrity Basketball Game at The Lovett School’s Wallace Gymnasium. The game featured a friendly competition between Team Dale Ellis and Team Dikembe Mutombo, along with several of their fellow NBA legends. Breakthrough Atlanta’s programs help middle and high school students develop the academic skills and study habits to enroll and succeed in college – and, ultimately, in life.
  1. According to the Atlanta Journal Constitution’s J. Scott Trubey Wilbert clients Colony Square and Peachtree Center were “mixed-use before mixed-use was cool.” Now these Atlanta landmarks are gearing up for major overhauls that their owners say will open the developments to their surroundings. In December, North American Properties and equity partner Lionstone Investments acquired the two office towers and mall and announced plans to turn Colony Square into Midtown’s “living room.” For Peachtree Center, the basic design won’t change, but there are plans to add restaurants and shops in the outdoor plaza to make the complex more inviting.

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Making News: Our Clients in the Headlines 6/3/16

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  1. 031416_weekend_roundup_jp01Have you gone down Peachtree in Midtown recently? We’re guessing yes, and we’re guessing you’ve noticed the giant MIDTOWN letters sitting at the corner of 15th Street and Peachtree, standing eight feet tall and spanning a total of forty feet. While these may seem like a tourist trap, Jill Vejnoska at the Atlanta Journal Constitution wrote that a funny thing happened outside of Wilbert client Colony Square: “People started liking them. A lot.” Jill wrote a great feature in the AJC, saying, “Almost as soon as the letters appeared, people began taking selfies with them, sometimes posting them on social media with the hashtag #IAmMidtown. In just two months, they’ve become a staging spot for all sorts of public events, from jazz concerts and a “Bike to Work Day” promotion to an Earth Day celebration.” Welcome to the new hottest spot in Midtown!
  1. The laws of supply and demand have become more complicated at Orlando’s big theme parks as they make shifts in pricing strategies. Recently, Disney has aggressively raised prices. In October, the company revamped its annual-pass system to make it much more expensive for people to visit during Christmas and spring break. Then in February, it announced tiered one-day ticket prices. The Magic Kingdom costs up to $124 on the busiest days. According to Matt Busch at Wilbert client Revenue Analytics, “The right pricing strategy can benefit both the company and the customer — that idea of…. managing demand so you don’t have these crazy crowds that can’t be served well.”
  1. UnknownLooking for an estate near Athens? Wilbert client Beaver Dam Farms, the 973-acre estate formerly owned by country singer Kenny Rogers, is heading to auction on July 9. The estate is centered around a 12,000-square-foot mansion and includes three private spring-fed lakes, five guest houses and a clubhouse and a lake clubhouse. Also on the property is an equestrian arena that includes 44 stalls and two swimming pools, as well as two clay tennis courts and an 18-hole golf course. The owners said they will sell the property to the highest bidder “at or above $3.5 million fully furnished.” You can get more details from the Atlanta Journal Constitution, the Atlanta Business Chronicle, and, a Wilbert first, TMZ!
  1. Jeffrey Bayer, president and CEO of Birmingham-based Wilbert client Bayer Properties, has been named to the board of trustees for International Council of Shopping Centers. Bayer is a part of the select group of international leaders in the retail industry that serve on the board. “It is a privilege to join the international leadership of ICSC,” Bayer said in a statement. “ICSC is the most influential organization in our industry and represents thought leadership and innovation. I am truly honored to sit on its Board of Trustees.”
  2. Atlanta-based national labor and employment firm and Wilbert client Fisher & Phillips has ditched the ampersand and rebranded as Fisher Phillips. The firm unveiled a new logo, tagline and website to go with the streamlined name as part of the campaign to update its brand. “Fisher Phillips is a strong, modern firm that can take on the toughest cases for the most discerning clients. Our brand will now reflect that,” said its chairman, Roger Quillen, in an announcement from the 350-lawyer firm.

 

Media Moves: February, 2016

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As former journalists, we still love to get —and share— the latest newsroom scoop, especially when it involves recruiting a great reporter over to our team. In Media Moves, we highlight the latest happenings in journalism and media, and this is an especially exciting edition for us.

Charlotte Business Journal Reporter Turns PR Pro

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Will Boye

Will Boye, commercial real estate reporter at the Charlotte Business Journal, has joined us at The Wilbert Group. Boye will open our second office in Charlotte, overseeing PR efforts for key accounts including Crescent Communities, Skanska and Lincoln Harris, and aims to help grow our presence throughout the region. Boye was with the CBJ for 12 years, and covered banking and finance from 2003 to 2009.

 

AJC Reporter Joins Dallas Morning News

Atlanta Journal-Constitution city hall reporter Katie Leslie has announced she will depart at the end of the month. Leslie will relocate to Washington, D.C., where she will cover Texas delegation and congressional policy for The Dallas Morning News. Her replacement has not been announced.

Long-time staffers Rick Badie, Christopher Seward and Tom Sabulis also recently left the paper. Badie has joined the United States Postal Service as communications programs specialist.

 

Shake-Up at WSB-TV

Nicole Carr is joining WSB-TV in Atlanta next month. She comes to the city from Raleigh, North Carolina, where she has been a reporter at WTVD since 2013. She replaces Rachel Stockman, who recently moved to New York and helped launch LawNewz.com, where she is senior editor.

Ed Baker leaves the Atlanta Business Chronicle; Part of his Legacy is a Great Alumni Network

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Big news today in the Atlanta newspaper world: Ed Baker is retiring as publisher of the Atlanta Business Chronicle after 30 years. Reading the news got me thinking about what a great alumni group the Chronicle has.

Ed Baker, Atlanta Business Chronicle

Ed Baker, Atlanta Business Chronicle

I worked at the Chronicle in the late 1990s as a reporter. Though my time there was brief (less than two years), it looms large in my mind. The Chronicle launched my business journalism career, I made a lot of friends and most importantly I met Tony Wilbert. Back then Tony was just the best beat reporter I had ever met. Now he is my husband, the father of my three children and my business partner at The Wilbert Group.

 

We worked with some great people at the Chronicle who are still close friends – like Erin Moriarty, now a freelance writer; Matt Gove, now Chief Consumer Officer at Piedmont Hospital; and Julie Bryant Fisher, now VP of marketing at the Atlanta Community Food Bank. (Julie and I still get to work together because I am lucky enough to be on the advisory board at ACFB.)

 

And I have also become friends with so many people through the years, who worked before me at the Chronicle. People like Anita Sharpe, who left the Chronicle for The Wall Street Journal and is now Bloomberg’s bureau chief in Atlanta; Jason Kelly, now bureau chief for Bloomberg in New York; and Kelly Greene, who spent many years at The Wall Street Journal and now works in content strategy for BlackRock.

 

And there were a lot of interesting people who came after me too, with whom I bonded over our mutual Chronicle-ness. I became friends with Kate Carter, who left the Chronicle to become a teacher and then an entrepreneur. And Mary Jane Credeur, who went to Bloomberg and now works at Transwestern.

 

Baker leaves behind good people at the Chronicle, as well as an alumni network doing super-cool things across Atlanta and the country.

 

I am not sure Ed ever forgave Tony and me for leaving the Chronicle for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, but we are certainly grateful for our time there and especially for all the cool Chronics (current and former) we know.

 

Lots more great alumni to mention: Dean Anason, now at American Banker; Scott Trubey, now a reporter at the AJC; Walter Woods, now the Atlanta area director of marketing for Hyatt; Evelina Shmukler Burnett, now a reporter at Mississippi Public Broadcasting; Elizabeth Drachman, communications manger at DAI; Michael Wall at Georgia Organics; Marcy Frank, a communications VP at Credit Suisse in New York. I could go on and on. There are so many great friends and what a blessing to be part of this alumni group. Google has nothing on us!