The Wilbert Group Blog

Posts by Liz Maddux

Media Moves: July 2017

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We love getting – and sharing the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Jewel Wicker, digital arts and entertainment reporter for the Atlanta Screen Shot 2017-07-13 at 1.41.09 PMJournal Constitution, has left the paper and started her journey as a freelancer specializing in entertainment. Jewel created a variety of content for the AJC including event roundups, concert reviews, TV recaps and more.

With all the changes magazines face, the one consistent trend is the decline of print advertising. Moody’s estimates that print ads will continue to fall 10 percent through mid-2018.

Min spoke with various publications about their new revenue strategies.

Read more about it here:

Closing the Gap: How Magazine Media is Solving for Print Losses

“Change is like oxygen: We need it to exist. It’s part of the daily rhythm of life. Instead of running away from it, try to embrace it,” Ron Smith, managing editor for news at USA Today, told Poynter in a Q&A about challenges he faces in his news organization as well as advice he has for others.

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Read more about it here:

USA Today managing editor for news talks challenges, advice and guidance

Did you know nearly two-thirds of adults in the United States who use Twitter get their news from the social media platform? Pew Research Center takes an in-depth look at how adults are using Twitter for news, not only whether they tweet about news and follow news organizations, but also what news topics they tweet about, and how many news media accounts they follow.

Read more about the findings here:

How do Americans use Twitter for news?

Media Moves

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We love getting – and sharing — the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Catie Dixon, national editor at Bisnow, spoke about editorial strategy on the “New Media Species” panel at the National Association of Real Estate Editors spring conference. Dixon began as a reporter at Bisnow in 2009, and says the publication is not as “inside baseball” as it used to be. Now, reporters and editors are looking increasingly for real estate stories that are interesting and relevant to a broader audience. Dixon said retail and sports stadiums are interesting to everyone and having a U.S. president who is a real estate developer translates to lots of real estate story angles with broad appeal.

Catie Dixon (middle) talked about Bisnow's editorial strategy at NAREE in Denver, Colorado last week.

Catie Dixon (middle) talked about Bisnow’s editorial strategy at NAREE in Denver, Colorado last week.

Dixon also shed some light on Bisnow’s revenue model. The site’s content is 100 percent free (no paywall) and while Bisnow generates some revenue from advertising and sponsored content, the majority of their revenue comes from events.


 

National television news shows appear to be holding on to their viewership numbers, while political talk shows are actually growing, according to a new Network News Fact Sheet from Pew Research Center. The data reveals the combined average viewership for the ABC, CBS and NBC networks remained stable, decreasing only one percent in 2016. On a more interesting note, the combined average audience for Sunday’s political talk shows on the three networks grew by 14 percent in 2016, following an eight percent increase from 2014-2015.

Read more here:

The patterns and data about network TV news.

McClatchy’s is trying to refresh its newsrooms with a “digitial reinvention” strategy. McClatchy’s team is advising journalists to spend more time gathering stories that digitial audiences are looking for in local journalism. Tim Grieve, vice president of news for McClatchy, said readers come to a local site for local content, so generic celebrity fluff or cute videos are not an asset. Digital audiences are looking for a deep story with a strong personality element; these are the biggest audience engagement winners.

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McClatchy’s big move to digital journalism has proven successful so far. The first two newsrooms to complete the digital reinvention program saw their page views rise 26 percent and 58 percent, respectively.

The McClatchy Company is an American publishing company based in Sacramento, California. It operates 31 daily newspapers including (Raleigh) The News & Observer, The Miami Herald and The Sacramento Bee.

Read more here:

McClatchey’s plan to reinvent its newsrooms.

Screen Shot 2017-06-20 at 11.08.13 AMIf you love the TV show or blog “The Pioneer Woman,” you’re in luck! Just a few weeks after reducing the frequency of Dr. Oz The Good Life, Hearst Magazines wants you to know it still believes in celebrity-driven publications. The Pioneer Woman Magazine debuted on June 6 and is being sold in 4,000 Walmart stores across the country. A spokesperson from Hearst tells min that distribution beyond Walmart will be determined after the two-issue pilot run.

Read more here:

The Pioneer Woman Magazine is Ree Drummond’s latest project.

 

Media Moves: June 2017

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We love getting – and sharing the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 11.13.26 AMCNN celebrated its 37th anniversary on June 1. Go back in time with Jennifer Wood, senior editor of MentalFloss.com, as she recaps CNN’s first day on the air.
Read more here:

CNN celebrates 37th anniversary

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Washington D.C. bureau chief, Michael Scherer, sat down with min to discuss the details behind his one-of-a-kind story about President Donald Trump. Time magazine recently spent nearly three hours with the president in his private quarters. Scherer shares what it’s now like covering the president and D.C politics.

Read more here:

Behind the Story: Tim’s Intimate Dinner with the President

As news junkies, we love behind-the-scenes looks into news organizations and how they make decisions. We’ve noticed a number of newspapers in recent years, including our local Atlanta Journal-Constitution, offering readers more of this information. The New York Times published an article recently explaining and illustrating the front page before and after F.B.I Director, James B. Comey’s firing. Who knew the front page of The Times starts each day as a hand-drawn sketch on green paper?

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Read more here:

An F.B.I. Director Is Terminated, and a Front Page Is Too

Laura Kern, former executive editor of New York Magazine, is taking on the role of editor-in-chief of Apple News. The popular Apple app does not currently have original content as it pulls top stories from participating media brands. Will Kern turn Apple News into that of a distributive content creator?Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 9.46.41 AM

Read more here:

Apple News Poaches New York Magazine Executive Editor

 

 

 

Media Moves: May 2017

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We love getting – and sharing ­ the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally

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11Alive hired a new morning host. Cheryl Preheim, a former broadcast host at the NBC affiliate in Denver, Colorado, said she plans to embrace Atlanta and tell stories that connect with people.

Read more about her story here:

New 11Alive morning host embraces Atlanta

As video continues to evolve media companies hurry to adapt. See how companies like Time Inc. and Condé Nast are rethinking their format and distribution strategies to include video.

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As video evolves media companies try to adapt

The New York Times just named former Buisnessweek editor in chief, Ellen Pollack, to top editor of its business section.

Read more about this story:

Ellen Pollack named editor of The New York Times business section

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-26 at 11.58.01 AMAfter 15 years publishing print editions, Mental Floss magazine decided to go completely digital in 2017. Despite what you may think, the brand argues that shedding its print product opened many new doors.

Read more about this story:

Life after print for Mental Floss

After 40 years of making readers laugh, The New Yorker’s beloved cartoon artist, Bob Mankoff, retired at the end of last month.

Read more about his story:

Bob Mankoff will step down as The New Yorker magazine’s cartoon editor


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Media Moves: April 2017

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We love getting – and sharing —  the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

Mitchell Northam is the new hyperlocal digital reporter for North Fulton at the Atlanta Journal Constitution. Northam is a native of Maryland and graduated from Salisbury University in 2015. Northam worked for the Delmarva Times as a breaking news reporter and covered sports in the area. He has written for USA Today and SB Nation. He recently wrote an article about #WilbertClient North American Properties’ Avalon expansion.

Read about it:

Details of Avalon’s Expansion: Apple store, four-star hotel among what’s coming 

Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 1.42.52 PMThe Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s yearlong investigative series, Doctors and Sex Abuse, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. The awards were announced Monday.

Read about it:

AJC Doctors is a series finalists for the Pulitzer Prize

Clifton Leaf, the new editor-in-chief at Fortune, announced the magazine has grown in two places this year. The first, video, makes sense, but the other, print, is more of a surprise. Leaf, formerly deputy editor at the magazine, shared his vision recently with min.

Read about it:

Good Fortune in Fortune’s future

The Amazon Echo has surprised everyone with its broad acceptance, and the large number of news organizations already participating on the platform. What will voice-enabled internet mean for journalism? Between Amazon Echo, Google Home and Siri it’s no surprise journalism is making the move to these digital platforms. Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 1.43.43 PM

Read about it:

Voice Enabled Internet and Journalism

Magazines are learning a new language

 

 

Media Moves: Let’s Tech About It

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We love getting – and sharing —  the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

With virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and the Amazon Echo, technology is advancing so rapidly these days it seems like flying time-traveling DeLorean’s soon might be a real possibility. 2016 was the first billion-dollar year for VR and it makes us wonder, how will the media use these new advances in technology to their benefit?

Virtual reality is expected to have more of an impact than TV and 3D ever did. It can be incorporated with your smartphone and has the power to transport you to another place.  It’s more natural because you’re literally in the middle of the experience.media-virtual-reality

Sanjay Macwan, chief technology officer of the NBCUniversal media labs, believes VR offers an “I felt like I was there” experience, and media will be able to use that to their advantage.

“At the basic level, virtual reality is a new thing and you always want to give something new to your consumers,” Macwan said. “This will provide a more intimate experience for the consumer in relation to the media’s content.”

Media companies believe in creating a media ecosystem – a community that exists across multiple channels from websites to social media and beyond. By including VR in their platforms, media outlets can tell stories like never before by literally inserting the consumer into the story.

When a new form of technology can revolutionize the way we communicate with the media, we should explore it. For centuries, the media has been technology-driven, moving from handwritten to hot and cold type printed media to digital and now virtual. VR is the next step in media storytelling. With it, the media will be able to guide readers through the story with interactive imagery aligned with the written word.

We look forward to embracing this new way of storytelling, do you?

Media Moves: Trump vs. the Media

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We love getting – and sharing —  the latest newsroom scoop. In Media Moves, we highlight changes in journalism and the media both locally and nationally.

President Donald Trump’s battle with the media is unprecedented. News junkies wonder how this tension will change the media landscape, a landscape that already has been fundamentally altered in recent years due to technological and cultural shifts.

Here’s what some journalists have to say on the topic:

 

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Steve Adler, Editor-in-Chief at Reuters:

“It’s hardly surprising that the air is thick with questions and theories about how to cover the new Administration…So what is the Reuters answer?…We already know what to do because we do it every day, and we do it all over the world…I am perpetually proud of our work in places such as Turkey, the Philippines, Egypt, Iraq, Yemen, Thailand, China, Zimbabwe, and Russia, nations in which we sometimes encounter some combinat

ion of censorship, legal prosecution, visa denials, and even physical threats to our journalists. We respond to all of these by doing our best to protect our journalists, by recommitting ourselves to reporting fairly and honestly, by doggedly gathering hard-to-get information – and by remaining impartial. We write very rarely about ourselves and our troubles and very often about the issues that will make a difference in the businesses and lives of our readers and viewers.”

Read the full article.

Michael Wolff, columnist at USA Today:

“At the Wall Street Journal, there has been a debate about how to characterize, what many regard as, Trump’s disregard for the truth. Should his misstatements be labeled as outright lies? The Journal’s editor, Gerry Baker, argued, no, the facts should be clear, but a motive, to purposefully mislead, should not be assumed…The issue may not be Trump at all, but, the startling socio-political divide he’s revealed. It’s two nations opposed to each other, with the media almost entirely on one side of the divide. It’s not so much Trump that the media doesn’t know how to cover, but a social movement that sees the media as one of its significant enemies. In this, Trump’s behavior, his constant tweets, his tit for tats, his free associations, his high baloney quotient are all designed to disrupt the media foe, and, among other things, give it a nervous breakdown. In other words, the media is taking the Trump bait.”

Read the full article.

 Margaret Sullivan, media columnist at The Washington Post:

“One thing is certain in the presumptive era of President Trump. Journalists are going to have to be better — stronger, more courageous, stiffer-spined — than they’ve ever been…What we can’t do is buckle. What we can’t do is slink off and hope someone else will take

care of it. We have to keep doing our jobs of truth-telling, challenging power and holding those in power accountable — as the best journalists did during the campaign itself. We have to be willing to fight back.”

Read the full article.

Matthew Ingram, senior writer at Fortune:

“A weakened and increasingly marginalized traditional media, fighting with the tools of a previous era, surrounded by more nimble adversaries who know how to use social platforms for their own ends, and a president who is actively hostile to the traditional press. Not that long ago, it probably felt like things couldn’t get any worse for the media—but they just did.”

Read the full article.

Rise Up for Smart PR

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The first thing I do in the morning after pouring myself a cup of hot coffee is turn on the news. I watch the news every morning because being in PR means it is crucial to know what’s happening in the world, the country and locally.

And just in case you were sleeping under a rock, what’s happening in Atlanta is that the Falcons are playing in the Super Bowl. Smart PR professionals identify ways to take advantage of a trending news topic to generate excitement for clients. We are supporting

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Natalie Fultz with Fox 5 interviews Mike Gomes, senior vice president of the Atlanta Falcons, at Atlantic Station’s  Rise Up Rally.

our clients as they “rise up” with Falcons-themed social media campaigns, events and PR programs.

 

  • Our client Atlantic Station is this year’s host of the Official Atlanta Falcons Rise Up Rally. The first event, before the NFC Championship game against the Green Bay Packers, was a huge success between media turnout and the incredible number of dirty bird fans who attended. With the Super Bowl nearly upon us, Atlantic Station is hosting another Rise Up Rally on Jan. 29 and we can’t wait to help host journalists and fans on the big day.

 

  • We also launched a successful social media campaign for client Peachtree Center, Rise Up Fridays, where fans can either post a selfie in their game attire on Instagram or go to Guest Services at Peachtree Center and be entered to win a Matt Ryan Jersey. So go show your Falcons pride!

 

  • Fisher Phillips partner Terri Stewart appeared on 11Alive this morning to discuss some of the workplace do’s and don’ts for employers and Atlanta Falcons fans leading up to Super Bowl LI. Watch her discuss calling in sick, office gambling and dress code policy for fans wearing Falcons apparel.

 

Of course, we have some of our own Dirty Birds right here in the office! The Wilbert Group is hosting Falcons Spirit Day next Friday; we’ll be decked out in black and red and may even have some hot wings. Follow us on our Instagram to see our pics.

Go Falcons!